Medical

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HSA

Why Choose the Health Savings Account?


  • Visit any provider
    • National coverage
    • No referrals or PCP selection (primary care provider) required
    • You generally pay less by visiting providers in the network
    • As with all City plans, preventive care is covered 100%
  • Pay less from your paycheck

  • Free money

    • The City gives you money each year to help pay for the care you receive
      • $1,000 annually if you're single or $2,000 annually if you're covering dependents (prorated for part-year enrollment)2
    • You can use the money for IRS qualified health expenses, including medical, dental, vision and Rx  
  • Money is yours to keep

    • Unused funds roll over year to year - no "use or lose it" penalty
    • You keep the money, even after you leave the plan, and can continue using it to pay for COBRA premiums or qualified health expenses 
  • Tax savings

    • You may make additional pre-tax contributions, which reduces your taxable income
    • Any after-tax contributions that you make are tax deductible
    • HSA funds earn interest tax free (except in NJ) and aren't taxed when used for IRS qualified health expenses 
  • Investment potential

  • Save for retirement

    • They also can provide additional retirement savings: After age 65, funds can be withdrawn for any purpose without penalty

1 Assumes care is received in-network
$500 is deposited after the first pay period of enrollment (pro-rated if you join after July 1), with $20 individual / $60 family deposits made for each of the remaining 25 pay periods of the year; deposits are made 1-2 weeks after each pay day

HSA

What's the catch?


  • Higher deductible: $2,000 individual/ $4,000 family3
    • You generally pay 10% after you meet the deductible, until you reach the annual out-of-pocket maximum ($3,000 individual/$6,000 family)3
  • You pay 100% for prescriptions, until you meet the deductible
    • This can be a challenge if you take expensive medications
  • Not everyone is eligible 
    • You must be an active employee with a valid SSN and a U.S. primary residence
    • You cannot be covered by any other type of health plan, including Medicare A or B
    • You cannot be covered by TriCare or a general purpose health care flexible spending account (FSA)
    • You cannot have received medical benefits from Veterans Administration for any non-service-connected disabilities at any time during the previous 3 months
    • If you have a second insurance (like through a spouse), it must also meet IRS definition of qualified high deductible health plan
    • You cannot be claimed as a dependent on another person's tax return (unless it's your spouse)
  • Until you're 65, don't use the funds for anything other than IRS-qualifying health care expenses, or you'll pay taxes and a penalty
    • After age 65, funds can be withdrawn for any purpose penalty-free
  • You'll receive a couple of tax forms each year (1099-SA and 5498-SA), and you'll have to file Form 8889 with your tax return to calculate taxes you may owe for non-qualified purchases

Visit HSA Bank's FAQ for additional details.


3 Assumes care is received in-network

HRA

Why Choose the Health Reimbursement Account?


  • Visit any provider
    • National coverage
    • No referrals or PCP selection (primary care provider) required
    • You generally pay less by visiting providers in the network
    • As with all City plans, preventive care is covered 100%1
  • Pay less from your paycheck
  • The City provides financial support
    • The City-owned HRA fund helps cover covered medical costs when you receive services
      • Note that the fund may not be used for dental, vision or Rx costs, like it can be under the HSA
    • You have access to the City’s annual contribution the first day of each plan year (or when your insurance begins, if you’re a new hire)
      • $1,000 annually if you're single or $2,000 annually if you're covering dependents (prorated for part-year enrollment)
    • Unused funds generally roll over year to year
      • However, you can lose the funds - see "What's the catch?" below
  • You pay a copay for prescriptions
    • $15 generic, $40 preferred, $60 non-preferred1
    • This may be easier to manage than the HSA drug plan if you have higher cost prescriptions

Assumes care is received in-network 

HRA

What's the catch?


  • Higher deductible: $2,000 individual/ $4,000 family3
    • You generally pay 10% after you meet the deductible, until you reach the annual out-of-pocket maximum ($3,000 individual/$6,000 family)3
  • The City owns the money in your HRA fund 
    • Think of the account as a "promise to pay" for qualified medical claims
    • Once you've spent the full fund, you're responsible for remaining costs
  • You can't use the funds for dental or vision expenses, like you can with the HSA
  • You will lose the money when you join another plan or leave City employment
  • Funds are reduced by $1,000 if you go from family coverage (covering at least one dependent) to individual coverage

Network

Why Choose the Network plan (formerly HMO)?


  • More predictable costs when you receive services
    • You pay copays for most care1
      • $25 primary care / $45 specialist copays
      • $75 urgent care copay
      • $200 emergency room copay
    • As with all City plans, preventive care is covered 100%1 
  • Lower deductible may make medical expenses easier to manage
    • $500 deductible applies to in-patient, out-patient, and advanced radiology
  • You pay a copay for prescriptions1
    • $15 generic, $40 preferred, $60 non-preferred
    • This may be easier to manage than the HSA drug plan if you have higher cost prescriptions

1 Must be received in-network, or coverage is 0%

Network

What's the catch?


  • Less flexibility when choosing where to receive care
    • You must choose a PCP (primary care provider), who coordinates all your care
    • Your primary care provider must register referrals with Cigna before you visit specialists
    • You must receive care and prescriptions in the network
      • You must live in a covered zip code
      • The network is limited to Arizona (no other states)
      • Not all Arizona providers and pharmacies are in the network
      • Only emergency services are covered outside the network, and emergency follow-up care must be received in-network
      • If you or your covered dependent lives outside the Arizona network, consider the HSA or HRA
      • Be sure you verify network status before you receive care
  • Pay more out of your paycheck

Compare HSA & HRA

The HSA and HRA coverage look similar. Are there differences?


Yes. They differ in terms of the funds that the City provides (i.e., the "money"), such as:

  • Who owns the money (you or the City)
  • When you get the money
  • Whether you can make personal contributions to your account or invest the money
  • Whether you can use the money to pay for dental and vision expenses
  • What happens with the money if you leave the plan or remove dependents from the plan

In addition:

  • The HSA has some eligibility restrictions - Visit HSA Bank's FAQ to see if you qualify
  •  You pay the full cost of prescriptions under the HSA until you meet the annual deductible, whereas the HRA has copays for prescriptions
  • We encourage you to review the plans' Summaries of Benefits and Coverage to compare coverage

Compare HSA & HRA

Who owns the money?


HSA

You own the money once it's deposited into your account.

HRA

The City owns the money. Think of the account as a "promise to pay" if you or a covered dependent has qualified medical claims. Eligible claims are paid automatically if funds are available. Once you've spent the full fund, you're responsible for remaining costs.

Compare HSA & HRA

When do I receive the money?


HSA

Every July 1st that you're enrolled in the medical plan with HSA, you'll receive $500 in late July. Additional funds are deposited into your account 1-2 weeks after each pay day for the remaining 25 pay periods each year: $20 for single coverage or $60 if you're covering dependents.

If you join the plan after July 1 (for example, as a new hire or due to a qualifying life event), the initial $500 is prorated.

HRA

You have access to the money at the start of each plan year (July 1): $1,000 for single coverage, or $2,000 if you're covering at least one dependent.

If you join the plan after July 1 (for example, as a new hire or due to a qualifying life event), the funding is prorated.

Compare HSA & HRA

Can I lose the money?


HSA

No. Unspent money is yours to keep and use on eligible expenses, even after you leave the plan.

HRA

Yes. If you disenroll or leave employment, you'll forfeit remaining funds.

Funds are also reduced by $1,000 if you go from family coverage (covering at least one dependent) to individual coverage.

Compare HSA & HRA

May I make personal contributions?


HSA

Yes. You may make personal pre-tax contributions to help your account grow faster, and to save on taxes. The combined amount of your personal contribution and the City's contribution may not exceed annual limits set by the IRS.

HRA

No.

Compare HSA & HRA

May I use the money for dental, vision and prescription expenses?


HSA

Yes, as long as the IRS considers them qualified health care expenses.

HRA

No. Funds are applied only to qualifying medical claims.

Compare HSA & HRA

May I invest the money?


HSA

Yes. You can invest your HSA bank funds in a wide range of mutual funds, stocks and bonds.

HRA

No. The money in the HRA account belongs to the City. It is a "promise to pay" if and when you have qualifying claims.

Compare HSA & HRA

Is additional paperwork required?


HSA

When you join:

Although you usually won't have to provide additional documents when you join the plan, sometimes the bank will run into issues when it tries to verify the data in your profile as part of the federally required Customer Identification Process. This can happen if you've moved or changed your name. In that case, the bank will ask for additional documents. 

Every year:

You'll have to file IRS Form 8889 with your tax return. You'll receive both a 1099-SA tax form that shows total contributions to your account and a 5498-SA that shows withdrawals, including payments to health care providers. You'll want to save receipts showing how you spent the money to be able to demonstrate that funds were used for qualified expenses if you're ever audited by the IRS.

HRA

Because the City owns the funds and applies them only to qualifying expenses, no additional documents are required from you.

Pharmacy

Mail Order Pharmacy

Pharmacy

Cigna 90Now 

  • 90-days of medication for the price of 60 days at participating pharmacies

Pharmacy

Step therapy - Save money by trying generics before more expensive brand versions of medications

Get Help Choosing

Access codes (2021-22 plan year):
•Salary Less Than $60k: WTTZ9CJT
•Salary $60k-$100k: 63CRYNQW
•Salary More Than $100k: DAHCTX37

Questions? Cigna's pre-enrollment professionals can help: 888-806-5042

Contact the Benefits team

520-791-4597

benefitquestions@tucsonaz.gov

 

Devan Gengler

Cigna Well-Being Coordinator

520-282-1806

Devan.Gengler@Cigna.com

 

Angela Reynolds

Cigna Client Service Partner

520-837-4180

Angela.Reynolds@Cigna.com

Contact Cigna 24/7/365

800-244-6224

mycigna.com

24-Hour Nurse Line
800-564-8982

Included in all plans

Included in all plans

Included in all plans

Included in all plans

Included in all plans


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